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Event: 13th Stevenson Memorial Tournament • 75 games + 39 from subsidiary competitions
Venue: Bognor Regis • Dates: 21 April - 1 May 1965 • Download PGN

13th Stevenson Memorial, Bognor Regis - 21 April - 1 May 1965 (Venue: Butlins, Bognor Regis)

(crosstable reproduced from this page at the Belgian Chess History site)

1965 Bognor Regis International Nat'y Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11  Total 
1 GM O’Kelly de Galway, Albéric BEL Belgium +55 +24 ½7 +3 +6 ½8 +11 +9 +12 ½2 ½4 9
2 IM Wade, Robert Graham NZL Ilford +58 +29 +30 ½7 ½14 ½9 ½3 ½8 +6 ½1 +12 8
3   Hindle, Owen Mark ENG Norwich +50 +10 ½4 -1 +31 +22 ½2 ½11 +8 ½5 ½9
4 IM Kottnauer, Čeněk ENG London +56 +16 ½3 +5 -8 -12 +34 +10 ½9 +11 ½1
5   Andrić, Dragoslav YUG Yugoslavia +57 +22 ½13 -4 +27 ½7 -10 +48 +28 ½3 +11
6   Keene, Raymond Dennis ENG Clapham +51 +26 ½8 +28 -1 ½13 +23 +12 -2 ½9 ½10 7
7   Cafferty, Bernard ENG Birmingham +46 +15 ½1 ½2 ½22 ½5 ½26 ½28 ½13 ½14 +23 7
8 IM Karaklajić, Nikola YUG Yugoslavia +60 +11 ½6 +23 +4 ½1 -12 ½2 -3 ½16 +22 7
9   Hartston, William Roland ENG Enfield +54 ½33 ½18 +41 +44 ½2 +14 -1 ½4 ½6 ½3 7
10   Parr, David ENG Sutton +53 -3 -11 +20 +47 +30 +5 -4 +22 ½17 ½6 7
11   Doney, Ronald A ENG Norwich +42 -8 +10 +21 +18 +14 -1 ½3 +15 -4 -5
12   Littlewood, Norman ENG Sheffield +19 ½23 -33 +24 +39 +4 +8 -6 -1 +25 -2
13   Winser, W Arthur ENG Hastings ½44 +21 ½5 ½29 +33 ½6 ½28 ½22 ½7 ½19 ½17
14   Milner-Barry, Philip Stuart ENG London +34 ½25 +38 +33 ½2 -11 -9 ½32 +39 ½7 ½19
15   Howson, James B ENG Ilford +27 -7 ½24 ½39 ½25 ½38 +32 +26 -11 +28 ½16
16   Bonkenburg, Jan NED Netherlands +43 -4 ½27 ½38 +53 -26 +40 ½20 +31 ½8 ½15
17   Dymond, Michael John ENG Bournemouth -22 +37 -49 +57 +46 ½34 ½25 ½29 +35 ½10 ½13
18   Lloyd, David E ENG London ½31 +45 ½9 +49 -11 -28 ½35 ½24 ½21 +44 +33
19   Glaser, Jan (Dr) ENG Newcastle -12 +40 -22 +50 +49 -24 +45 ½39 +26 ½13 ½14
20   Hall, Arthur ENG Worthing +59 -30 -21 -10 +52 +41 +38 ½16 ½23 ½29 +31
21   Brogden, John G ENG London ½32 -13 +20 -11 -35 ½50 +57 +49 ½18 +39 +29
22   Parr, Frank ENG   +17 -5 +19 +25 ½7 -3 +33 ½13 -10 +38 -8 6
23   Sombor, Andrew P ENG   +47 ½12 +32 -8 ½29 +44 -6 ½25 ½20 +27 -7 6
24   Walker, John N ENG   +40 -1 ½15 -12 ½38 +19 -29 ½18 +53 +42 ½25 6
25   Denman, Brian John ENG   +52 ½14 ½28 -22 ½15 +31 ½17 ½23 +32 -12 ½24 6
26   May, Alan K ENG   +41 -6 +58 -44 +48 +16 ½7 -15 -19 +44 ½28 6
27   Matchett, Harry Gethin Thorp ENG   -15 +60 ½16 +53 -5 ½35 ½30 +34 ½29 -23 +38 6
28   Faase, Rob NED   +48 ½38 ½25 -6 +41 +18 ½13 ½7 -5 -15 ½26
29   Myant, Martin Roy ENG   +35 -2 +47 ½13 ½23 -32 +24 ½17 ½27 ½20 -21
30   Bouaziz, Nejib TUN   +37 +20 -2 ½31 ½32 -10 ½27 -35 ½45 +52 ½34
31   Boyce, James R § ENG   ½18 ½44 +34 ½30 -3 -25 +54 +33 -16 +36 -52
32   Champion, Kenneth F ENG   ½21 +36 -23 +42 ½30 +29 -15 ½14 -25 -33 +48
33   Pratten, Wilfred Henry ENG   +49 ½9 +12 -14 -13 +46 -22 -31 +40 +32 -18
34   Baldwin, Terry D ENG   -14 +50 -31 +36 +43 ½17 -4 -27 ½46 +51 ½30
35   Felce, Harold George ENG   -29 -58 ½55 +56 +21 ½27 ½18 +30 -17 -26 +44
36 WIM Sunnucks, (Patricia) Anne ENG   ½45 -32 ½43 -34 -40 +60 +51 ½47 +37 -31 +50
37   Mazītis, Arnolds ENG   -30 -17 -42 -40 ½56 +58 +55 +54 -36 +46 +45
38   Lemon, Richard C ENG   +39 ½28 -14 ½16 ½24 ½15 -20 +40 +48 -22 -27 5
39   Ross, Robert P ENG   -38 +54 ½53 ½15 -12 +49 +44 ½19 -14 -21 ½43 5
40   Muchalov, A. YUG   -24 -19 -48 +37 +36 +51 -16 -38 -33 +57 +52 5
41   Healiss, A. J. ENG   -26 +51 +46 -9 -28 -20 ½43 ½50 -42 +55 +49 5
42   Van Seelen, Svend DEN   -11 ½43 +37 -32 ½45 -47 ½50 ½46 +41 -24 +51 5
43   Ballard, Kenneth Oliver ENG   -16 ½42 ½36 +54 -34 -45 ½41 -53 +56 +47 ½39 5
44   Nathan, R. H. ENG   ½13 ½31 +57 +26 -9 -23 -39 ½45 +47 -18 -35
45   Harper, D. G. ENG   ½36 -18 -54 +55 ½42 +43 -19 ½44 ½30 ½48 -37
46   Damant, Charles Ambrose Scott ENG   -7 +48 -41 +58 -17 -33 ½49 ½42 ½34 -37 +53
47   Nash, R. J. ENG   -23 +56 -29 +52 -10 +42 -48 ½36 -44 -43 +58
48   Evans, Wilfred ENG Chorleywood -28 -46 +40 +60 -26 +57 +47 -5 -38 ½45 -32
49   O'Brien, Richard W IRL   -33 +55 +17 -18 -19 -39 ½46 -21 ½59 +53 -41 4
50   Sorensen, P. A. ENG   -3 -34 +56 -19 ½54 ½21 ½42 ½41 -52 +59 -36 4
51   Mills, L. J. ENG   -6 -41 -52 +59 +58 -40 -36 +57 +54 -34 -42 4
52   Love, Stanley Charles ENG   -25 -53 +51 -47 -20 -59 +60 +55 +50 -30 -40 4
53   Nicholas, Geoffrey James ENG   -10 +52 ½39 -27 -16 -54 +59 +43 -24 -49 -46
54   Williams, R. ENG   -9 -39 +45 -43 ½50 +53 -31 -37 -51 -56 +60
55   White, A. ENG   -1 -49 ½35 -45 -59 +56 -37 -52 +60 -41 +57
56   Comber, Frank Thomas ENG   -4 -47 -50 -35 ½37 -55 ½58 ½60 -43 +54 +59
57   Parr, Peter ENG   -5 +59 -44 -17 +60 -48 -21 -51 +58 -40 -55 3
58   Lighton, Richard J ENG   -2 +35 -26 -46 -51 -37 ½56 ½59 -57 +60 -47 3
59   Exell, Ernest George ENG   -20 -57 -60 -51 +55 +52 -53 ½58 ½49 -50 -56 3
60   Knott, Gordon ENG   -8 -27 +59 -48 -57 -36 -52 ½56 -55 -58 -54

§ Given as J. C. Boyce in BCM but I'm pretty sure this is the Bristol player James R Boyce - JS

[Report by PH Clarke, BCM, June 1965, pps 153-158]

If Mr. J. N. Fishlock-Lomax had any misgivings about the success of the thirteenth congress in his series, they were rapidly allayed. This year’s event, held in Butlin’s Holiday Camp from April 21st to May 1st, attracted some sixty entries fewer than the 1964 record of 417 (owing to the overlapping of school and university terms) and grandmaster Stahlberg withdrew just before the start because of illness. There the disappointments ended. The competitors were again able to make use of the amenities of the camp undisturbed and obtain a foretaste of summer by the sea, while on the more serious side the leading foreign and home contestants provided plenty in the way of good chess.

A. O’Kelly and N. Karaklaic, both inveterate victors at Bognor, started strong favourites in the Stevenson Memorial Tournament, but the participation of Kottnauer, Wade, Hindle, N. Littlewood, and Cafferty guaranteed worthy opposition. Furthermore, much was expected of Hartston, Keene, and David Parr, youngsters who have begun to make their presence felt at a national level during the last year.

In the end, O’Kelly lived up to his grandmaster title by taking the top prize of £100 with a round to spare, but the struggle for the other places and the Southern Counties’ Championship proved exceedingly close and it was not until after the official Closing Ceremony that the decision was known. However, let me not run ahead of my story.

With so many players (sixty) the opening rounds are necessarily devoted to sifting out the potential contenders for the prizes. A rough system of seeding avoided major clashes, but on the second day there were several games between players who finally scored 6½ or more. The following one, in which Black reduces his opponent to Zugzwang with surprising speed and economy, appealed to me the most.

[Howson - Cafferty]

Round 3 saw the first appearance of a lone leader, when Wade won a long game against N. Bouaziz to preserve his 100 per cent score. The young Tunisian reached an ending with the draw seemingly well in hand but on the 50th move he lost a vital pawn and was unable to recover it. The other three top encounters were all drawn. Cafferty kept O’Kelly on a tight rein, while Hindle and Kottnauer settled for a dead equality from the opening. Only Keene and Karaklaic fought to the bitter end. The seventeen-year-old Londoner tackled his task with great vigour and though he eventually left himself with a weakened King’s position, he fully deserved to share the point.

Wade conceded a draw to Cafferty in the fourth round and was immediately overhauled by the pack. The best wins of the day were O’Kelly’s strategic effort against Hindle and Kottnauer’s more delicately balanced tactical success. Here is the latter—

[Kottnauer-Andric]

The leading scores now were: Karaklaic, Keene, Kottnauer, Milner-Barry, O’Kelly, and Wade 3½; Cafferty, Doney, Hartston, D. Lloyd, Nathan, and F. Parr 3.

In the next round the two favourites both won again and so pulled ahead of the field. O’Kelly gave Keene a valuable lesson in positional play, and Karaklaic defeated Kottnauer in no less instructive fashion. The British master followed a book recommendation but found that the resulting middle-game was by no means as comfortable as expected. White manoeuvred his “bad” Bishop via Q R 4 to Q B 6 and then exploited his spacial advantage to force a breakthrough on the Queen’s side. Kottnauer resisted ingeniously but in vain.

There was almost a big upset when Hindle came near to defeat at the hands of J. C. [James R] Boyce, of Bristol. A pawn down in an inferior position, Hindle set a desperate trap; Boyce took the bait and lost his Queen for a Rook.

Meeting each other in Round 6, O’Kelly and Karaklaic halved the point in fourteen moves. No doubt O’Kelly would have tried harder had he come out of the opening with any initiative. As it was, it would have been senseless for either player to push his luck. They were joined in the lead by R. A. Doney, one of the tournament’s outsiders. Since losing to Karaklaic in the second round, he had surged up with four straight wins. His latest success, against Milner-Barry, was based on excellent end-game play against doubled isolated King’s Bishop’s pawns.

Very little happened in the Hartston-Wade and Winser-Keene encounters, but Andric and Cafferty had a most spirited struggle. In spite of all the material and attacking fluctuations, the end was still peaceful. Kottnauer slipped further back by blundering in a tense situation against Littlewood. Norman had started poorly but at last seemed to be regaining his form.

Doney made little impression on O’Kelly’s French Defence in Round 7. The Norwich player ran out of attacking units after sacrificing heavily to keep the black King in the centre. The Belgian grandmaster’s position in the lead looked even happier when Littlewood got the better of Karaklaic in an interesting tactical battle and picked up a series of pawns. Like Littlewood, David Parr was another to register his fourth consecutive win—and this at the expense of the Yugoslav second string, Andric.

Hartston stole up to second place by making the most of a minimum of chances. Milner-Barry emerged from some exciting play with an advantageous ending but instead of accepting repetition of moves when it became clear his initiative had petered out, he persisted and brought about his own downfall. Hartston’s future opponents would be well advised to take draws when he offers them! Keene was also somewhat fortunate in that Sombor could have forced perpetual check at one stage; that would have been a fairer conclusion to an imaginative, though far from faultless, game.

The leading scores after seven rounds were: O’Kelly 6; Hartston and Littlewood 5½; Doney, Hindle, Karaklaic, Keene, D. Parr, and Wade 5.

O’Kelly’s lead increased to a full point in the eighth round. His win against Hartston showed how serious a handicap an isolated Queen’s pawn can be when it is not offset by active piece play.

[O'Kelly-Hartston - position after 31.Rd3]

In the diagrammed position White’s pressure Black (Hartston) is already intolerable, but it is not so much the loss of the pawn that is decisive as the switching of the attack from the centre to the King’s side. Play continued: 31 ..., R—Q Kt 5; 32 P-K4!, RxKP; 33 QxP ch, K—Kt 1 ; 34 RxP, Q—K 1 ; 35 Kt—Kt5, RxR; 36 RxR, R—K 7; 37 Q—R 7 ch, K—B 1; 38 Q-R8 ch, K—K 2; 39 R—K5 ch, RxR; 40 QxR ch, Resigns.

Littlewood was replaced in second spot by Keene, who beat him by a mixture of impressive middle-game play and some faltering in the end-game. None of the others on the 5-point mark could win, although Wade came very close to victory against Karaklaic and Hindle missed a clear mating possibility during a hectic time scramble with Doney. This last game, which opened with the same variation of the Sicilian as Hindle’s triumph over Gligoric at Hastings, was the most thrilling of the whole tournament and packed with brave decisions by both players.

Round 9 took O'Kelly another step nearer first prize. However, it was not achieved without some anxious moments, for Littlewood was definitely on top at one time and justifiably refused a draw. But having overlooked a clear winning chance in the ending, he was driven back on to the defensive and left with a hopeless position at the adjournment.

Apart from the draws between Hartston and Kottnauer, who was back in the picture after two wins lower down the list, and Cafferty and Winser (both still unbeaten) the chess in the other important games was also of an uncompromising nature. Keene and Wade had a particularly eventful struggle. Finally, experience told, and Wade secured a commanding grip on the situation. Karaklaic suffered a further serious setback. He made a positional pawn sacrifice in the opening but failed to profit from it. Hindle gradually assumed the initiative and then forced the exchange of Queens and the transition to a won ending. Both Doney and D. Parr scored their sixth win. Doney lowered the colours of Howson’s Queen’s Pawn Counter Gambit for the first time (in more than a dozen games) and Parr defeated his father!

The leading scores now were: O’Kelly 8; Doney, Hindle, and Wade 6½; Andric, Hartston, Keene, Kottnauer, and D. Parr 6.

Fifteen moves of the Orthodox Defence to the Queen’s Gambit brought O’Kelly a draw against Wade and with it the certainty of at worst a share of first place. Later, Hindle's draw with Andric and Doney’s loss to Kottnauer removed this last possibility and gave the grandmaster victory with a round to spare. As the great majority of the leaders avoided any risk, an opportunity to recover ground presented itself. Littlewood availed himself of this by beating Denman, the joint British Boy Champion, but Karaklaic could not overcome Bonkenburg’s steady defence.

The leading scores before the last round were: O’Kelly 8½; Hindle, Kottnauer, and Wade 7; Andric, Doney, Hartston, Keene, Littlewood, and D. Parr 6½.

Although the top honour had already been taken, the destination of the remaining prizes and the title of Southern Counties’ Champion evoked considerable interest and speculation. Hindle, Kottnauer, and Wade were all eligible for the championship, and calculation revealed that a tie would probably resolve in favour of Hindle on the basis of his superior sum-of-opponents score.

As expected, O’Kelly and Kottnauer quickly concluded peace. Then Hindle, getting nothing from the opening against Hartston, did the same. Everything therefore depended on Littlewood and Wade—whether the last-round result at Southend could be reversed or not. A long battle developed, in which White’s two Bishops and active position were counterbalanced by the need to defend hanging pawns. Littlewood could have reached a drawn ending with Bishops of opposite colours almost at will but he tried for more, fell into a subtle trap, and lost the exchange. The technical difficulties facing Black were still formi-able, however, and all the other games were finished well before the outcome was clear. Wade’s success made him second alone and Southern Counties’ Champion for the third time.

Meanwhile, Doney had lost on time against Andric; Keene and D. Parr had reached 7 points by drawing in dramatic style; Cafferty had emerged from his run of draws to inflict a severe defeat on Sombor; and Karaklaic found his winning touch again at the expense of Frank Parr.

The final scores were as follows: Alberic O’Kelly 9; Robert G. Wade 8; D. Andric, Owen M Hindle, and Cenek Kottnauer 7½; Bernard Cafferty, William R Hartston, N. Karaklaic, R. D. Keene, and David Parr 7; J. Bonkenburg, J. G. Brogden, R. A. Doney, M. J. Dymond, J. Glaser, A. Hall, J. B. Howson, N. Littlewood, D. E. Lloyd, P. S. Milner-Barry, and W. A. Winser 6½; Brian J Denman, H. G. T. Matchett, Alan K May, Frank Parr, A. P. Sombor, and J. N. Walker 6; T. Baldwin, N. Bouaziz, James R Boyce §, K. F. Champion, R. Faase, H. G. Felce, A. Mazitis, Martin R Myant, W. H. Pratten, and Miss (Patricia) Anne Sunnucks 5½; K. O. Ballard, A. J. Healiss, A. Lemon, A. Muchalov, R. P. Ross, and S. O. van Seelen 5; C. A. S. Damant, Wilfred Evans, D. G. Harper, R. J. Nash, and R. H. Nathan 4½; S. C. Love, L. J. Mills, R. W. O'Brien, and P. A. Sorensen 4; F. T. Comber, Geoffrey James Nicholas, A. White, and R. Williams 3½; E. G. Exell, R. J. Lighton, and P. Parr 3; G[ordon] Knott 1½. § the original gives J. C. Boyce but I'm assuming this was a typo for the Bristol player J. R. Boyce - JS

O’Kelly’s victory, his sixth at Bognor Regis, was thoroughly deserved. He is a grandmaster of long experience, and he played with the competence and composure expected of him. His supremacy does not detract from the good performances put up by the leading home representatives. If Kottnauer was not quite at his best, Wade certainly had an excellent tournament, and both Hindle and Cafferty played consistently and soundly; even Norman Littlewood showed some of his former drive and inspiration.

Hartston, Keene, and David Parr all lived up to the promise of their growing reputations. They merit being ranked among the “top twenty” players in the country, and it may not be long before they are knocking on the doors of the “top ten.” A common strength is that they are not noticeably overawed by master opposition.

Lastly, I must mention Doney and Winser. Doney started the event as just another outsider but won for himself a place among the leaders and the distinction of meeting stronger opposition than anyone else. Winser went through the tournament unbeaten. Some people look sneeringly upon such records. I can assure them that they are not by any means easy to achieve.

The Stevenson Memorial Tournament which I have just described is to be the last as part of the Bognor Regis International Chess Congress. In fact, from next year the congress itself will be renamed The Butlin Open Chess Championships. It will include the same or similar events, but without the incorporation of the main S.C.C.U. Championships. While a certain regret will be felt regarding this break and its causes, it may not in the final count prove unbeneficial to chess and chess-players. There will be good grounds for holding another new congress!

The prize-winners in the other events were—

Championship Reserve (ten-day all-play-all).—(1) P. J. Smith; (2) Trevor W Robbins.

Major (ten-day all-play-all).—(1) G. Michieli 8; (2) George A Peck 7.
Major (six-day all-play-all, morning).—(1) Leslie Edward Vine 6½; (2) H. M. Wilkins 5½.
Major (six-day all-play-all, afternoon).—(1) Joseph John Lauder 6½; (2) A. D. Chaikin 5½.

First Class (six-day all-play-all, morning).—(1) E. V. Foulds 6; (2) A. E. Barnes 5½.
First Class (six-day all-play-all, afternoon).—(1) L. West 7; (2) B. E. Loveday 6.

Second Class (six-day all-play-all, afternoon).—(1) A. Donovan 7; (2) Robert B Kenyon 6.

SCCU U18 Boys’ Championship (six-round Swiss).—(1) Peter R Morriss 6; (2) Jonathan G Enticknap 5½.
SCCU U16 Boys’ Championship (six-round Swiss).—(1-3) R. L. Bush, R. G. Gray, and Russell J Mildon 5½.
SCCU U14 Boys’ Championship (six-round Swiss).—(1) Maurice J Staples 6; (2) Roger Webb 5½.
SCCU U12 Boys’ Championship (seven-round Swiss).—(1) P. Levy 6½; (2-3) John D M Nunn and R. Rose 5½.
SCCU U14 Girls’ Championship (double-round five-day all-play-all). —(1) Lynda Bott 7; (2) E. Scurfield 5½.
SCCU U12 Girls’ Championship (seven rounds all-play-all).—(1-3) S. Banks, J. Spencer, and P. Warner 6/7.
Junior Supporting Event (eight-round Swiss).—(1) B. Large 7; (2-3) C. Cahill and M. Harbut 6.

Major (five-day all-play-all, morning).—(1) Raymond Bott 3½; (2-4) H. C. Garner, J. P. Hodgkins, and R. L. Gittins 3.
Major (five-day all-play-all, afternoon).—(1) Geoffrey H James 4; (2) Miss Dinah Dobson 3.
First Class (five-day all-play-all, morning).—(1-2) Peter F Rosman and E. V. Foulds 4.
First Class (five-day all-play-all, afternoon).—(1) R. Power 4½; (2-3) D. N. Harrison and G. Burnett 3.
Second Class (five-day all-play-all, morning).—(1-2) D. Parker and D. J. R. Longrigg 4½.
Second Class (five-day all-play-all, afternoon).—(1) J. L. Harris 5; (2-4) L. Spain, C. H. Jeffcock, and M. Negus 3.
Open Swiss (five-day).—(1) J. McCreath 4; (2) C. Novakovich 3½.
Weekend Major—(1) J. H. Gard(e)ner 3½; (2-3) J. Whelan, Terence Clifford Noyce 3.
Weekend Major Reserves—(1) Paul Durrant 5; (2) A. J. Thurgood 4.
Weekend Minor A—(1) Leigh Trangmar 5; (2) W. F. Nichols 4.

The Mystery of the Beheaded Black Knights...


File Updated

Date Notes
pre-2019 Original upload with 61 games - from Big/Mega Database, which ChessBase must have sourced from The Bognor Regis International Congress 1965, BCM Quarterly No. 9, edited by J Norman Fishlock-Lomax.
5 June 2019 Number of games now 114, with 75 from the main section and 39 from subsidiary groups. I have added games from the Bernard Cafferty and Wilf Pratten collections here on BritBase, and the Raymond Keene collection on chessgames.com. Full dates now given, full names and sources where known and some corrections applied. I have also added a complete crosstable of the main tournament, plus contemporary report and full results from BCM.
29 April 2022 Correction applied to PGN file and table: Karaklajic's first-round opponent was Gordon Knott (1900-1996), not G A Knott. There is a player called Gavin A Knott but he was born in 1972.