www.britbase.info
© 1997-2021
John Saunders

 

BRITBASE - British Chess Game Archive

Tournament: 3rd British Championship (won by Atkins) (32 games of a possible 66; includes 26 games from subsidiary events)
Venue: Shrewsbury • Dates: 6-18 August 1906 • Download PGN • Last Edited: Thursday 8 April, 2021 3:27 PM

1906 British Chess Championship, Shrewsbury, 6-18 August1905« »1907

1906 British Chess Championship Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  Total 
1 Atkins,Henry Ernest Leicester
&;
1 1 ½ 0 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1
2 Michell,Reginald Pryce London 0
&;
0 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1
3 Palmer,Wilfred Charles Manchester 0 1
&;
0 1 1 1 ½ ½ 0 1 1 7
4 Lee,Francis Joseph London ½ ½ 1
&;
1 ½ 0 ½ 1 0 1 1 7
5 Shoosmith,Hector William London 1 0 0 0
&;
1 0 1 1 1 1 1 7
6 Wainwright,George Edward, snr London 0 ½ 0 ½ 0
&;
1 1 1 1 1 1 7
7 Blackburne,Joseph Henry London 0 0 0 1 1 0
&;
1 1 1 ½ 1
8 Wahltuch,Victor Leonard Manchester ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0
&;
0 1 1 1
9 Mercer,Arthur Emerson London 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 0 1
&;
0 1 1 4
10 Hamond,Francis Edward (Rev) London ½ 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1
&;
0 0
11 Parry,John Ellis Shrewsbury 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 1
&;
½ 2
12 Brown,Frank Dudley 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ½
&;

1906 British Ladies Championshp

1906 British Ladies Championship Draw no. Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  Total 
1 Mrs Frances Dunn Herring (née Gwilliam) 4 Hove
&;
0 ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9
2 Mrs Gertrude Alison Beatrice Anderson (née Field) 1 London 1
&;
½ 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1
3 Miss Grace Ellis (later Curling) 3 London ½ ½
&;
1 ½ ½ 1 1 0 1 1 ½
4 Mrs Mary Mills Houlding (née Palmer) 6 Cardiff ½ 0 0
&;
0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
5 Miss Georgiana Watson 12 Hastings 0 0 ½ 1
&;
0 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 7
6 Mrs Annie Sophia Roe (née Verdon) 10 London 0 1 ½ 0 1
&;
0 1 0 1 0 1
7 Miss Alice Elizabeth Hooke 5 London 0 0 0 0 0 1
&;
1 1 0 1 1 5
8 Miss [Kate] Eyre 9 London 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
&;
1 1 1 1 4
9 Miss Agnes Bradley Lawson (later Stevenson) 8 W. Hartlepool 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0
&;
1 0 1 4
10 Miss Agnes Margaret Crum 2 Helensburgh 0 1 0 0 ½ 0 1 0 0
&;
0 1
11 Mrs Hannah Maria Joughin (née Blogg) 7 London 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1
&;
½
12 Miss Edith Mary Ann Tapsell (later Michell) 11 Redhill 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½
&;
1

1906 First-Class Amateur Tournament

1906 BCF First-Class Amateur Draw no. Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  Total 
1 Georg Schories 12 Sheffield
&;
½ 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
2 James Frederick Allcock 1 London ½
&;
1 1 0 ½ 0 1 1 1 1 0 7
3 Patrick William Fairweather ‡ 6 London 0 0
&;
1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 7
4 James Mortimer 8 London 1 0 0
&;
1 0 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 7
5 Edward Davidson Palmer 10 London 0 1 1 0
&;
1 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 7
6 John James O'Hanlon 9 Portadown 0 ½ 0 1 0
&;
0 1 0 1 1 1
7 James Borthwick 2 Glasgow 0 1 0 ½ ½ 1
&;
0 0 ½ 0 1
8 Edwin Joseph Brooks 3 London 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
&;
0 1 1 ½
9 Philip Walsingham Sergeant 11 London 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1
&;
0 ½ 0
10 John Dibbin Chambers 4 Sale 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 1
&;
1 1 4
11 Rev. Evan Griffiths 7 Gowerton 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 1 0 ½ 0
&;
1 3
12 Arthur William Daniel 5 Bridgend 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 1 0 0
&;

‡ the identity of P W Fairweather was discussed on the English Chess Forum. Rod Edwards (of Edo Historical Chess Ratings) saw this and told us (i.e. Gerard Killoran, Richard James and me) that Fairweather had played in tournaments in San Francisco around 1895. As a result of this, we've been able to identify the player as Patrick William Fairweather (born 1860, Scotland, died 1945, Alameda, California) who must have revisited the UK around 1906 and played in this event.

[BCM, September 1906, p349-357] "THE BRITISH CHESS FEDERATION CONGRESS.

"The Third Annual Congress promoted by the British Chess Federation was held at Shrewsbury from August 6th to 18th, and proved a great success. The Congress was held under the joint auspices and management of the Federation and the Midland Counties Chess Union, but we believe that the suggestion to hold the meeting in the county town of Shropshire emanated from the well-known Salopian players, Mr. J. C. Douglas, Mr. F. W. Forrest, and Mr. W. H. Greenhalgh, whose efforts in the matter aroused the interest of the leading citizens and chess players of Shrewsbury, and secured the co-operation of his Worshipful the Mayor (Mr. R. E. Jones) and the Corporation, who followed the example set last year by Southport, and officially recognised the National Chess Society, by granting free of charge the City Music Rooms, which are excellent in every way for the purposes of a chess congress, being spacious, lofty, and easy of access. Some critics were afraid that the Shropshire capital would not prove so attractive as Hastings or Southport, but to the lover of historical events Shrewsbury offers many attractions, and a sojourn there can always be made one of interest and pleasure.

"The Congress was formally opened at 6 p.m. on Monday, August 6th. when the members of the Federation were received by the Mayor, who was supported by Alderman Southam, Councillor Thomas Corbett, Mr. G. H. Lock (President Shrewsbury Chess Club). Mr. F. W. Forrest (secretary), Mr. J. C. Douglas (treasurer), and many other officials.

"The Mayor said he was delighted to have the honour, as the representative of the Municipality, of extending to the members of the British Chess Federation a hearty welcome to the ancient borough of Shrewsbury—the county town of Salop. He understood that the Congress at Hastings in 1904 was highly successful; also that the Congress last year at Southport was a most worthy successor; and he expressed the hope that the Shrewsbury Congress of 1906 would excel, if it were possible, the success of its predecessors—Southport and Hastings. Chess had acquired unique importance throughout the world, and it occurred to him that it was peculiarly fitting that a Chess Congress should be held in that old and historical town, which had played an important part in the history of England and Wales. The Welsh princes used to come without any formal invitation, and they provided their own entertainment, very much at the burgesses’ expense. The Kings of England, with few exceptions, from William the Conqueror down to James II., stayed in Shrewsbury, and it might be taken for granted that in the very realistic scenes of those congresses between the warlike Welsh princes and the Kings of England many a King had been checkmated within the walls of Shrewsbury. It appeared most appropriate that at the beginning of the twentieth century a Chess Congress, whose members were some of the most intellectual ladies and gentlemen of the time, should meet at Shrewsbury, as a distinctly favourable contrast to the olden times when Welsh princes and English Kings played their warlike game upon other boards, under the shadow of stone castles, with most disastrous results to the vanquished. He assured them that there was a keen desire on the part of the Corporation and inhabitants of Shrewsbury that everything should be done to ensure the comfort of the visitors and the success of the Congress. They would find the town and adjoining country full of interest. He assured them, in the words of the old Shropshire toast, that “ All friends round the Wrekin ” wished them what their American friends would describe as “ A real good time,” and he would remind them that the Mayoress and himself were looking forward to the pleasure of seeing them all at their home.

"Alderman Southam said he had great pleasure in supporting the welcome. He advised the members to go through the town. They would find in it, he believed, many more real old houses than they would find in Chester, not in one part, but scattered among the alleys and byeways of the town. They would find, too, a town beloved by kings—one of which Edward IV. was particularly fond, and in which two of his sons were born. If they had time to visit other places round about Shrewsbury, Ludlow for example, he thought they would say that it was as fair a county and as fair a town as any place they had been in. As a member of the Corporation deeply interested in the town, and on behalf of the committee, who would be glad to help the Federation in any way, he gave them a most hearty welcome to the most ancient and loyal borough of Shrewsbury.

"Mr. G. W. Hughes (secretary Midland Union Committee) said, on behalf of the Federation and the Midland Union, he begged to tender their thanks to the Mayor and people of Shrewsbury for the handsome building they had provided, and also for their efforts to make the meeting a success. He had no doubt that if that success depended alone upon their efforts it would be assured, because they had met them in the most generous manner. The Mayor and Alderman Southam should be singled out for special thanks; neither should they forget Mr. Forrest, who had kindly acted as secretary of the local committee, nor Mr. Dougias, who had done good service as treasurer.

"Mr. Leonard P. Rees endorsed Mr. Hughes’ remarks. The charming surroundings he had been able to see made him wish to some extent that the days were going to be spent in some other way than in those rooms. They appreciated the welcome very much indeed.

"On Thursday, August 8th, the Mayor and Mayoress gave a Garden Party to the members of the Federation and friends at their residence, Oakley Grange. About 260 guests were present, and amongst those who accepted invitations were Sir John and Lady Thursby, Mr. J. Bowen-Jones the Ven. Archdeacon and Mrs. Maude, Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Browne, Major and Mrs. Atcherley. Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Rees (Redhill), Mrs. Clarke (Meole Brace), Mr. and Mrs. Cresswell Peele, Sir Clement Hill, M.P., K.C.B., K.C.M.G., Mrs. Baird (of Brighton), Mr. and Mrs. Bowles (London), Mrs. J. H. Blackburne, Mrs. Taylor (Abbey Foregate), Miss Agnes Gardiner (Weybridge), Rev. G. T. and Mrs. Hall, Mr. S. C. Kershaw (Willesden), Mr. and Mrs. Done, Major Drury (Llandovery), Mr. H. Drury, Mrs. G. D. Hutton (Stirlingshire), Mr. and Mrs. W. S Bartlett (Redhill), and nearly all the competitors in the various tournaments.

"On Saturday, August 11th, a Problem-Solving competition took place, and attracted eighteen competitors. Four problems were submitted—two in two moves and two in three. One of the two-movers was found to be unsound by two solvers—J. Keeble and A. W. Daniel; but the latter nullified the advantage he had gained by failing to find the correct key to one of the three-movers. The judges were Mrs. W. J. Baird, of Brighton, and Mr. F. R. Adcock, Norwich, who. after a long examination of the solutions, awarded first prize to Mr. J. Keeble, Norwich, 48 points; second, Mr. J. W. Dixon, Hanley, 40, and Mr. V. L. Wahltuch, Manchester, 39. The three sound problems were composed for the tourney by Messrs. E J. Winter-Wood, Paignton; L. P. Rees, Redhill; and Max J. Meyer, Boscombe.

"The tournament for the British Championship produced one of the closest contests ever known in any similar event in this country; the interest gradually increased till the very last round.

"When play began in the final round, on Friday, August 16th, the position of the leaders was Atkins 7½, Michell 7, with one unfinished game, Wainwright 6½ with one unfinished, and Palmer 7. Each of these four players had therefore a possible chance of attaining the highest position, whilst Shoosmith and Lee each having scored 6 points, were likely candidates for the lower prizes. The morning's play, however, settled Palmer’s championship hopes, and left Wainwright with a bare possibility of tieing for the honours. These changes were brought about by Lee’s defeat of Palmer in a complicated game, and Shoosmith’s victory over Wainwright.

"Atkins and Michell, each with 7½ points to their credit, met in the evening to continue their game which had been left over from the earlier sitting. Forces at the resumption were equal, but it was seen that Michell would have difficulty in defending an isolated Pawn. This eventually fell, and Atkins by careful yet forcible tactics compelled his opponent’s resignation and secured the championship for the second time.

"To have won the British Championship twice in succession, in addition to his many other notable achievements, proves Mr. H. E. Atkins (if further proof were needed) to be one of the greatest British players who have appeared for many years past, and one who could be relied upon to take a prominent position in any large International Tournament.

"His present success has not been gained without a severe struggle, and in many of his games he has been more hardly pressed than he appeared to be at Southport. He won his long game with Mercer through a temporary weakening of his opponent, and it was the general opinion that Hamond with a Pawn ahead should have scored the full point against him. His great resourcefulness in difficulties was shewn in these and other contests, and one does not know whether to admire most his power in difficult defence, or his relentless pressing of a minute advantage.

"Michell's position was thoroughly well earned by consistently sound and accurate play. He held the lead till the eighth round, when his defeat by Palmer brought Atkins level with him. He indulged in no fireworks, made few mistakes, and his only slice of luck was being "let off" by Wainwright in the eighth round; the latter overlooking a rather obvious win, which would have given him the second position.

"Of the four players who tied for third and fourth prizes, Lee began in his customary and uncompromising style, winning two and drawing four out of his first six games. Later he felt it necessary to adopt more vigorous methods, and though these cost him a game against Hamond, yet they were in the main part successful.

"The play of the three other prize-winners—Palmer, Shoosmith, and Wainwright—has been specially marked by light and shade. Each lost games through blunders and weak moves, but they have all shared in providing some of the brightest and most interesting chess of the tournament.

"Much regret was expressed that Blackburne could not attain to a higher place, but his chance was almost extinguished by his losing his first three games. He often seemed to play listlessly or even timidly, avoiding complications, and apparently trying to bring matters to the end-game.

"Wahltuch, though his score is a low one, gave at least two of the finest exhibitions of skill in the tourney. One was his draw against Atkins, which, but for a remarkably subtle combination on the part of the champion, he would undoubtedly have won. The other was his fine win against Hammond, ending with a pretty mate in three.

"Mercer showed himself to be a much-improved player, and as he entered the tourney with diffidence will be gratified by his position.

"Hamond would have done better if he had followed his natural bent for attack ; defensive tactics do not suit his style.
Parry is too much of a passive resister; but Brown, with a much bolder style, was the cause of brilliant play by some of his opponents.

LADIES' CHAMPIONSHIP

"The tournament for the British Ladies’ Championship also produced a close struggle; indeed, throughout the contest the five leaders seldom were more than one or two points apart. The reversal of the positions occupied at Ostend by Miss Ellis, Mrs. Anderson, and Mrs. Herring is rather curious. Some very good games were played, but generally speaking timidity is the characteristic of most lady chess players. In the final round Mrs. Herring was paired against Miss Lawson, who missed a chance of winning a Kt or forcing a draw by perpetual check. Had Miss Lawson forced the draw, Mrs. Herring and Mrs. Anderson would have tied for first place, with scores of each.

"Mrs. Herring plays very steady thoughtful chess, and her victory was very popular. She has competed in all the three Federation tournaments. At Hastings she tied with Mrs. Anderson for second prize, with a score of 7½ points. Last year, at Southport, she won fourth prize, with a score of 7½. She competed in the Second Class Open Tournament of the Kent Association at Tunbridge Wells in 1902, and divided second prize with Mr. W. P. MacBean (London) and Mr. H. Ward, of Croydon. Mrs. Herring achieved rank as a first class player of the county of Sussex by her success last year in winning the West Sussex Queen Trophy. Previous to this success Mrs. Herring won the Sussex Ladies’ Championship contest three years in succession. We believe her first experience of public play was gained in Brighton chess circles some ten years ago.

FIRST CLASS AMATEUR TOURNAMENT

"The First Class Amateur Tournament.—Mr. G. Shories, of Sheffield, the winner of the amateur tournament at Ostend, easily secured first place with 9½ points out of 11, but the main interest centred in the fight for second and third prizes, which were divided between Messrs. Allcock, Fairweather, Palmer, and Mortimer, each with 7 points. The last named, in spite of his 74 years, and also his journalistic duties, played some capital games, and was the only one to score a point from the winner. Mr. Shories is a native of Berlin, in which city he was born in 1874. He has been domiciled in England since 1895. In 1903, at the Canterbury Meeting of the Kent Association, he won first prize in the first-class open tournament.

(report continues below the following crosstables)

1906 Second-Class Tournament, Section A

1906 BCF Second-Class A Draw no. Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11  Total 
1 Percy R Gibbs 8 London
&;
1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8
2 L H Jones 9 Cardiff 0
&;
1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 8
3 Frank Raven Adcock 1 Norwich 1 0
&;
½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 1
4 Frederic Henry Crebbin 5 Liverpool 1 0 ½
&;
1 1 1 1 0 1 1
5 Ferdinand Uniacke Beamish 2 London 0 1 ½ 0
&;
½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 6
6 William Collins 4 Hereford 0 0 ½ 0 ½
&;
½ ½ 1 1 1 5
7 Joshua Walter Dixon 6 Hanley 0 0 0 0 ½ ½
&;
1 1 1 1 5
8 Frederick William Forrest 7 Shrewsbury 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0
&;
½ 1 1
9 Edward Algernon Michell 11 London 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 ½
&;
0 1
10 Richard Francis Lingen Burton 3 Shrewsbury 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
&;
1 2
11 John Lewis 10 Blaina 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
&;
0

1906 Second-Class Tournament, Section B

1906 BCF Second-Class B Draw no. Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11  Total 
1 Basil Heastie 5 Stafford
&;
1 ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 ½ 0 1
2 William Alfred Paley Hughes 6 Worcester 0
&;
0 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 7
3 Leslie Charles Gwyn Dewing 3 London ½ 1
&;
1 0 0 0 ½ 1 1 1 6
4 John Campbell Douglas 4 Shrewsbury ½ 0 0
&;
½ 1 1 ½ 0 1 1
5 William Rowland Thomas 10 Liverpool 0 0 1 ½
&;
1 1 0 1 1 0
6 George Herbert Lock 8 Shrewsbury 0 0 1 0 0
&;
0 1 1 ½ 1
7 George Arthur Youngman 11 Maidstone 0 0 1 0 0 1
&;
0 1 ½ 1
8 Alfred Axtell 1 Bristol 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 0 1
&;
½ 0 0 4
9 W Parry 9 Liverpool ½ 0 0 1 0 0 0 ½
&;
1 1 4
10 Bernard Fooks Bussy 2 London 1 ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ 1 0
&;
0
11 George Dickson Hutton 7 Falkirk 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1
&;
3

1906 Third-Class Tournament, Section A

1906 BCF Third-Class A Draw no. Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  Total 
1 E Crockett 1 Blaina
&;
0 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9
2 Alfred Henry Owen 10 Birmingham 1
&;
1 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1d 9
3 George Edward Panton 11 Manchester ½ 0
&;
½ 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1d 8
4 William George Elsmore 4 Norwich 0 1 ½
&;
0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1d
5 William Henry Greenhalgh 6 Dawley ½ ½ 0 1
&;
½ 0 1 1 1 ½ 1 7
6 John Thomas Eachus 3 Wellington 0 0 1 0 ½
&;
½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 6
7 G Long 9 Blaina 0 ½ 0 0 1 ½
&;
0 1 1 1 0 5
8 Miss Margaret Hunt 7 Barnstaple 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 1
&;
0 1 1 1d
9 Mrs Selina Charity Kershaw 8 London 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 1
&;
1 1 1
10 Mrs Seymour 12 London 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
&;
1 1d 3
11 Miss Agnes Thory Gardiner ‡ 5 Weybridge 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 0
&;
1
12 Maurice O'Connor Drury ¶ 2 Llandovery 0 0d 0d 0d 0 0 1 0d 0 0d 0
&;
1

‡ Agnes Gardiner was active in the campaign for women's suffrage - link here
¶ Presumably withdrew ill - he died on 18 December of the same year, aged 49. Not to be confused with his nephew of exactly the same name (who was born the year after his uncle died and named after him. Maurice's brother Henry also took part and withdrew from the congress - see below).

1906 Third-Class Tournament, Section B

1906 BCF Third-Class B Draw no. Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  Total 
1 Carrick Wardhaugh 12 Glasgow
&;
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1d 1 1d 11
2 Robert G(eoffrey?) Stark 11 Basingstoke 0
&;
1 0 ½ 1 1 1 1 1d 1 1d
3 Walter Duncan Barrow 2 High Lane 0 0
&;
½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1d 1 1d 8
4 Frank Round Pickering 9 London 0 1 ½
&;
0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1d
5 A(lbert?) J(ames?) Smith 10 Malton 0 ½ 0 1
&;
0 1 1 1 1 1 1d
6 D Jones 7 Blaina 0 0 0 0 1
&;
1 1 1 1 1 1d 7
7 Miss Emily Hunt 6 Barnstaple 0 0 0 0 0 0
&;
1 1 0 1 1d 4
8 Mrs Elizabeth Oakley (née Herbage) 8 London 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 0
&;
½ 1d 1 1d 4
9 Mrs Crichton 4 London 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½
&;
1 1 1d
10 Henry D'olier Drury ¶ 5 Marlborough 0d 0d 0d 1 0 0 1 0d 0
&;
0d 1d 3
11 Dr Frederick Henry Alderson 1 Bournemouth 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1d
&;
1d 2
12 Charles Henry Butlin 3 Camborne 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d
&;
0

¶ withdrew halfway through the tournament, as did his brother Maurice in Third-Class A (see above). Father of Maurice O'Connor Drury jnr, psychiatrist.

1906 One-Week First-Class Tournament

1906 BCF One-Week First-Class Draw no. Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6  Total 
1 Herbert Levi Jacobs 4 London
&;
½ 1 1 ½ 1 4
2 A Beamish 1 London ½
&;
0 1 1 ½ 3
3 Mrs Louisa Matilda Fagan (née Ballard) 6 London 0 1
&;
0 ½ 1
4 Frederick Ashford Eve 2 London 0 0 1
&;
1 0 2
5 Rev. Edward Gates 3 Kettering ½ 0 ½ 0
&;
1 2
6 Noel James Roughton 5 Shrewsbury 0 ½ 0 1 0
&;

1906 One-Week Second-Class Tournament

1906 BCF One-Week Second-Class Draw no. Resid. 1 2 3 4 5  Total 
1 Frank Clayton 1 Horsehay
&;
1 1 1 1 4
2 John Rowland Hanning 3 Worcester Park 0
&;
1 1 1 3
3 John MacAlister 4 London 0 0
&;
½ 1
4 Louis Felix McGuire 2 London 0 0 ½
&;
1
5 Frank Smart 5 Shrewsbury 0 0 0 0
&;
0

1906 One-Week Third-Class Tournament, Section A

1906 BCF One-Week Third-Class A Draw no. Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6  Total 
1 William Veitch 5 Southampton
&;
0 1 1 1 1 4
2 George Hofmeyer 2 Leyton 1
&;
1 0 1 0 3
3 John Harry Thomason 4 Birmingham 0 0
&;
1 1 1 3
4 John Herbert Milton 3 Liverpool 0 1 0
&;
0 1 2
5 A W Perry 1 Birmingham 0 0 0 1
&;
1 2
6 George Edward Wainwright, jnr 6 Surbiton 0 1 0 0 0
&;
1

1906 One-Week Third-Class Tournament, Section B

1906 BCF One-Week Third-Class B Draw no. Resid. 1 2 3 4 5  Total 
1 W R Todd ¶ 3 Crossgar, N Ireland
&;
1 1 1 1d 4
2 H Turner 5 Leigh 0
&;
1 1 1d 3
3 E E Burton 2 Reading 0 0
&;
1 1d 2
4 Rev. Robert Bee 1 Grantham 0 0 0
&;
1d 1
5 R T Hughes 4 Worcester 0d 0d 0d 0d
&;
0

¶ W R Todd, from Lisburn, Northern Ireland, seems to have been a prolific problemist, and yet I haven't been able to discover any biographical details for him.

"Third Class Tournament.—The competitors in the Third Class contest were divided into two sections, and the names of the successful players will be found in the full list of prize-winners given in our report of the closing meeting.

"On Tuesday, August 7th, was commenced an additional tournament, this being a handicap on a somewhat novel principle. The forty-two entrants were graded, according to strength, into eight classes, and any competitor had the right to challenge any other who was disengaged to play a match of not more than three games, with a time limit of twenty eight moves per hour. An important regulation was that a competitor might not challenge anyone more than two classes below him. The scoring was by points, each competitor being entitled to score :—

(a) For a win against a competitor in his own class, double the number of points that there are classes.
(b) For a win against a competitor in a class higher than his own, two additional points for each class such competitor is above him.
(c) For a win against a competitor in a class lower than his own, two fewer points for each class such competitor is below him.
(d) For a drawn game, half the number of points he would have scored if he had won the game.

"The tournament proved very successful, though naturally the chess was not of a serious character, as it formed a substitute for much of the aimless skittling which takes place between disengaged players at such meetings. First prize £2 2s., Mr. Wm. Collins (Hereford); second, £1 11s. 6d., Mr. C. Wardhaugh (Glasgow); third, £1 1s., Mr. W. R. Todd (Crossgar, Ireland); fourth, 10s. 6d., Mr. J. D. Chambers. Several lightening tourneys were also played during the meeting.

"The closing meeting and presentation of prizes took place on Saturday Aug. 18th, at eleven o’clock, when the president, Sir John O. S. Thursby, Bart., presided, and was supported by Alderman Deakin, Councillors Brace, Corbett, Done, and Laing, Dr. Gray, Mr. Lock (president Shrewsbury Chess Club), Rev. W. C. Palmer (president Northern Union), Mr. J. C. Douglas, Mr. F. W. Forrest, Mr. I. M. Brown (secretary Northern Union), Mr. G. W. Hughes (secretary Midland Union Congress Committee), Mr. L. P. Rees (secretary), and Mr. H. E. Dobell (treasurer of the Federation). The company assembled mustered nearly two hundred persons. Sir John Thursby, in opening the proceedings, said he wished on behalf of the Federation, to offer his hearty thanks to the Mayor of Shrewsbury, and those members of the Corporation who had welcomed them and made the stay of the members there so very pleasant. He was quite sure that although that might be the first visit of many of them, it would be by no means the last. As regarded the tournaments he thought they might say they had been entirely successful. The games had all been keenly fought and all the prizes were won by men of mark, and he was happy to think that during the whole of the contests there had been entire good feeling amongst the competitors. In speaking of what he hoped might be the future of the Federation. Sir John said the growth and development of the organization lay in the hands of the chess players of the country. It was impossible for the committee to carry on the work of the Federation successfully unless they had the financial support of the chess players who were scattered all over the country. He commended to their consideration and support the special fund which had been started. If they wished the Federation to live and to do the useful work he believed lay before it, they really must show their active interest in it in all the different Unions that had been established, and try and help to make it the central governing body of chess in the United Kingdom.

"Sir John distributed the prizes in accordance with the following list:—
List of prize-winners :—British Championship, first prize ;£6o, and trophy, Mr. H. E. Atkins; second, £30, Mr. R. P. Michell; third, , £20, and fourth, £10, divided by Messrs. Lee, Palmer, Shoosmith, and Wainwright. British Ladies’ Championship, first prize ;£10, and trophy, Mrs. Herring; second, £7 10s., Mrs. Anderson; third, £5, and fourth, £2 10s, divided by Mrs. Houlding and Miss Ellis. First-class Amateurs (full period), first prize £15, Mr. G. Shories; second, £10, and third, £5, divided by Messrs. Allcock, Palmer, and Fairweather. One Week Tourney, first prize, £6. Mr Herbert Jacobs (London); second, £4. Mr. A. Beamish (London). Second-class Amateurs, Section A, first prize £10, and second £5. divided by Mr. P. R. Gibbs (London) and L. H. Jones (Cardiff); third, £ 1 10s., divided by Mr. F. R. Adcock (Norwich) and Mr. F. H. Crebbin (Liverpool). Section B, first prize £10, Mr. B. Heastie (Stafford); second, £5, Mr. W. A. P. Hughes (Worcester); third, £2 10s., Mr. L. C. Dewing (London). Second-class One Week Tourney, first prize, £4, Mr. F. Clayton (Horsehay); second, £2, Mr. J. R. Hanning (Worcester Park). Third class Amateurs, Section A, first prize £5, and second divided by Mr. E. Crockett (Blaina) and Mr. A. H. Owen (Birmingham); third, £2, Mr. G. E. Panton (North Manchester). Section B, first prize, £5, Mr. C. Wardhaugh (Glasgow); second, £3, Mr. R. G. Stark (Basingstoke); third, £2, Mr. W. H. Barrow (High Lane). Third-class One Week Tourney, Section A, first prize jQ2, Mr. W. Veitch (Southampton); second, £1, divided between Mr. G. Hofmeyer (Leyton) and Mr. J. H. Thomason (Birmingham). Section B, first prize £2, Mr. W. R. Todd; second, £1, Mr. H. Turner (Leigh).

"British Amateur Championship Gold Medal.—Mr. Atkins and Mr. Shoosmith each scored 7 points for the medal offered for the best score compiled by an amateur against the remaining amateur players, but no arrangement regarding playing-off the tie was come to at Shrewsbury.

"After the distribution of the rewards, Mr. H. E Dobell proposed a vote of thanks to the Midland Union and the Local Committee. Mr. Hughes acknowledged the vote, and said that their best thanks were due to the Local Committee, who had done their utmost for the success of the Congress. He thought the gathering was equal to the previous Congresses, and he was glad to see that forty per cent, of the competitors had obtained prizes.

"Alderman Deakin, for the Local Committee, said he was glad that their efforts met with the approval of the members of the Federation. He hoped the visitors would carry away pleasant recollections of Shrewsbury, and that at some future date the Federation would again honour the county with another visit. He was desired by the Mayor to express his great regret that he was unable to attend that morning, and he assured the members that what the local committee had done had been a very great pleasure.

"Councillor Brace supported Alderman Deakin, and hoped that the Federation would again visit Shrewsbury. He was an old chess player, but he had seen more chess in the last fortnight than in the whole of his existence. The quality of the play had been so high that it was a great intellectual treat to come in and watch the games, and he was satisfied that the visit of the Federation had done inestimable good to the cause of chessplaying in Shrewsbury. Councillor Brace also referred to the Federation funds, which ought to be loyally and liberally supported by all chess players and chess clubs.

"The next item of the programme was the presentation of a pair of bronze ornaments to Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Rees. The gift was subscribed for by the players who had taken part in the various competitions, and was presented as a souvenir of the Shrewsbury Congress and a mark of appreciation for unvarying courtesy and kindness. Mr. Collins, of Hereford, made the presentation, which Mr. Rees acknowledged on behalf of Mrs. Rees and himself, and he said the work had been a real pleasure. Mr. Rees had scarcely resumed his seat when Mr. V. L. Wahltuch stepped forward and said he had been deputed to ask Mr. J. H. Blackburne and Mr. F. J. Lee to each accept a purse of gold, which had been subscribed for by those attending the Congress. The gifts were intended to express admiration for the great veteran and British master, Mr. J. H. Blackburne, whose services to chess it was not necessary to describe. He might say, however, that the majority of the players in those tournaments would not have been sufficiently strong to take part had they not had the benefit of Mr. Blackburne’s past experience. They also appreciated Mr. Lee's services to the cause of chess.

"The next business was a vote of thanks to Sir John Thursby, proposed by Mr. L. Hoffer and seconded by Mr. Jas. Mortimer. Sir John, in responding, again expressed the thanks of the Federation to the Mayor and Corporation of Shrewsbury for providing such excellent rooms for the Congress."


From the Manchester Guardian of 18 August 1906:

"Atkins takes the first prize of £60 and the championship: Michell takes the second prize of £30 and Palmer, Lee, Wainwright, and Shoosmith divide the third and fourth prize, receiving £7. 10s. each.

"The Ladies’ Championship. In the ladies’ tournament Mrs. Herring, of Hove, with 9 points, takes the first prize and the British championship medal, the second prize going to Mrs. Anderson, London, 8½. Miss Ellis, London, and Mrs. Houlding, Newport, 7½ each, divide the third and fourth prizes.

Other Tourneys.
The following are the prize-winners in the other tournaments:—
First-class.—1, G. Shories, Sheffield; for the second and third places J. F. Allcock, P. W. Fairweather, J. Mortimer, and E. D. Palmer, all of London, tie.
Second-class.—Section A: N.[mistake for "P" - Percy] R. Gibbs. London, and L. H. Jones, Cardiff, tie. Section B: B. Heastie, London.
Third-class.—Section A.: E. Crockett, Blaina, and A. Owen, Birmingham, tie. Section B: C. Wardhaugh, Glasgow.
One Week Tourneys.—First-class: Herbert Jacobs. Second-class: F. Clayton. Third-class sectlon A: W. Veach [Veitch? JS];
section B, W. R. Todd."


From the Manchester Guardian, 7 August 1906:

"THE BRITISH CONGRESS.
The third Congress of the British Chess Federation was opened at Shrewsbury last night in the Music Rooms, placed at the disposal of the Federation by the Corporation of Shrewsbury. The Mayor (Mr. R. E. Hill), Mr. Alderman Southam, and other members of the Corporation welcomed the chess players to their historic town. Mr. L. P. Rees, honorary secretary of the Federation, started the various tournaments at 6 30.

The entries are as follows:—
British Championship Tournament (12 entries)..—J. H. Blackburne, London; H. E. Atkins, Leicester; F. J. Lee, London; V. Wahltuch, Manchester; G E. Wainwright, London [Surbiton given in some newspaper accounts]; Frank Brown, Dudley; the Rev. W. C. Palmer, Bolton; J. E. Parry, Shrewsbury; R. P. Michell, London; H. W. Shoosmith, London; F. E. Hamond, London ; and A. E. Mercer, London.
British Ladies’ Championship (12 entries).— Miss E. Tapsell Redhill: Mrs. Jaughin, London; Miss A. Lawson, West Hartlepool; Miss Watson, Hastings; Miss Ellis, London; Mrs. Houlding, Newport; Mrs. Anderson, London; Mrs. Herring, Hove; Miss A. E. Hooke, London; Mrs. Roe, London; Mrs. Rentoul, London; and Miss Crum, Helensburgh.
First Class Tournament.—G. Shories, Sheffield: P. W. Fairweather, London; E. J. Brooks, London; P. W. Sergeant, London; J. D. Chambers, Sale; J. Borthwick, Glasgow; J. J. O’Hanlon, Ireland; J. Mortimer, London; the Rev. E. Griffiths, Gowerton; J. F. Allcock, London ; E. D. Palmer, London; and A. W. Daniel, Bridgend.
Second Class Tournament.—Section A: G. A. Probert, Worcester; F. B. Adcock, Norwich; J. W. Dixon, Hanley; John Lewis, Blaina; N. R. ["Percy" forename/nickname acc. Manchester Courier] Gibbs, London; W. Collins, Hereford; L. H. Jones, Cardiff; F. U. Beamish, Bristol; F. W. Forrest. Shrewsbury; F. H. Crebbin, Liverpool; R. F. L. Burton, Shrewsbury; E. A. Michell, London. Section B: G. D. Hutton, Edinburgh; M. Dees, Sunderland; W. R. Thomas, Liverpool; B. F. Bussy, London; A. Axtell, Bristol; J. C[ampbell]. Douglas, Shrewsbury: W. Parry, Liverpool; B. Heastie, London; W. A. P. Hughes, Worcester; L. C. G. Dewing, London; G. H. Lock, Shrewsbury; G. A. Youngman, Maidstone; A. J. Smith, Malton; W. D. Barrow, High Lane; C. Wardhaugh, Glasgow; H. D. Drury, Marlborough.
Third Class Tournament.—Section A; W. G. Elsmore, Norwich; Mrs. Seymour, London; Miss M. Hunt, Barnstaple; G. Long, Blaina; Miss Gardiner, Weybridge; Mrs. Kershaw, London; W. H. Greenhalgh, Dawley; E. Crockett, Blaina; J. T. Eachus, Wellington; G. E. Panton, Manchester; A. H. Owen, Birmingham; M. O. C. Drury, Llandovery. Section B: Dr. F. H. Alderson, Bournemouth; R. G. Stark, Basingstoke; Mrs. Oakley, London; Miss E. Hunt, Barnstaple; C. H. Butlin, Camborne; D. Jones. Blaina; F. R. Pickering, London; Mrs. Crichton, London."


"G. Shories, the hero of the recently concluded Amateur Tourney at Ostend, was born in Berlin, 1874. He took to chess at the time of the great Walbrodt-Schallopp match [in all probability 1891 - JS]. Mr Shories then moved to Magdeburg; but did not play serious chess till he came to London in 1895, the year of the Hastings Congress. His first notable success was at the Kent Congress of 1903, at Canterbury, where he came out first. The following year he drew a match with R. Loman, of Amsterdam and London. In 1905 he took first prize in the B minor tourney of tho German Chess Union at Barmen. This year, as is well known, he came out first at a similar tourney at Ostend. Mr Shories resided in Brighton after leaving London, and now resides in Sheffield, where he plays top board. His business, which he still pursues, prevents him from devoting all his time to chess as a professional. He is disqualified by birth from taking part in the British Championship tourney at Shrewsbury, so has to content himsolf to Class 1 in the amateur tourney, as Leonhardt had to do at Hastings the year before last."—"W[estern]. D[aily]. Mercury." (Reprinted in the Falkirk Gazette, 15 Aug 1906)

"R. P. Michell, one of the leaders in the British Amateur [sic] Chess Championship at Shrewsbury Congress, was born in 1875. When he was fifteen years of age he joined the Penzance C.C., and four years later he went to London to reside. There the first club that he joined was the Metropolitan. Here after a year’s play, and winning a handicap tournament, he was promoted to Class I. Some years later he was champion of the Metropolitan C.C. Then he joined the West London C.C., at that time a comparatively new club. Mr Michell’s play has done much to give this club the prestige that it possesses at the present time. He is also a member of tbe City of London C.C. For six years he has held the championship of the West London Club; and has played top board during that time in the League matches, A Division; in these matches his wins have averaged nearly 70 per cent. In the Hastings Amateur Championship, 1895, he won a prize, and at Norwich in 1902, he won the Championship of the Southern Counties Union. He has played three times in Anglo-American Cable matches, winning twice. He was first in an open tourney at Brighton in 1904. At Hastings, in 1904, in the British Championship, he scored 6½, coming out 5th; in 1905, at Southport, he tied for 7th place, with a score of 5½."— "W[estern]. D[aily]. Mercury"" (Reprinted in the Falkirk Herald, 22 Aug 1906)

"THE LADIES’ CHAMPIONSHIP.- Mrs Henry Herring [Frances Dunn Herring, née Gwilliam, born 4 April 1857, died 22 July 1943], who won the British Ladies Championship at Shrewsbury this summer, began chess in 1897, joining the St Anne's Club, Brighton, since which time she has played in every competition that she possibly could. In the 2nd Class open tournament at Tunbridge Wells, 1902, she tied for second place. She has held the Ladies’ Championship for Sussex three years running. Last year she won the West Sussex Queen, entitling her to enter the first-class. This year Mrs Herring came out third in the Ladies' International Contest at Ostend. In the first year of the Federation Congress, Hastings, 1904, she tied with Mrs Anderson for second place; and last year, at Southport, she came out fourth. The deciding game, that gave her the first prize and the Ladies’ Trophy this year, was a very difficult win." "W[estern]. D[aily]. Mercury"" (Reprinted in the Falkirk Herald, 29 Aug 1906)

"Mrs Donald Anderson [Gertrude Alison Beatrice Anderson, née Field, born 4th qtr of 1875, died 6 September 1924], who was second at the Federation Congress at Shrewsbury, learned the moves at the age of ten; and, at the age of fourteen, when she went to reside in Switzerland for two years, she challenged every one she met at hotels, and so got plenty of practice. She joined the Ladies’ Chess Club soon after it was founded. Hastings, 1895, she won the second prize. Mrs Anderson has been successful in several club tourneys, having held the club championship two years in succession. Norwich, 1902, she won the third prize in Class II. (open); Hastings, 1904, she tied for second place in the Ladies’ Tourney; and last year at Southport she did the same. At Ostend this year she was 2nd in the Ladies’ International Tourney." — "Western Daily Mercury.” (Reprinted in the Falkirk Herald, 29 Aug 1906)

"G. E. Wainwright, the winner of the championship City of London C.C., was born in Yorkshire, 1861. He learned chess at Bradford Grammar School. 1881 to 1885 he played for his University, Oxford against Cambridge. In recent years he has played for Surrey, where he resides, as well as for his native county. He was a member of the British Club, King Street, Covent Garden, while it existed. At one time he held the Newnes Cup for the Amateur Championship. Mr Wainwright is in the employ of the Local Government Board. His son took part in the B.C.F. Congress at Shrewsbury last year." —"W[estern]. D[aily]. Mercury." (Reprinted in the Falkirk Gazette, 27 March 1907)


File Updated

Date Notes
10 December 2015 Added Mercer-Blackburne (Round 6).
19 February 2016 Extra moves appended to Brown-Lee (round 1). Thanks to Gerard Killoran.
10 April 2016 Finish to Atkins's first-round loss to Shoosmith included.
8 February 2018 Score of Griffiths-Allcock (First Class) corrected. Thanks to Brian Denman.
5 April 2018 The name of a player corrected in the PGN file - 'Chambers, John Dillon' corrected to 'Chambers, John Dibbin' - as a result of researches made by Alan McGowan at the Chess Scotland website.
19 April 2018 Added Palmer-Atkins (Rd 6) - thanks to Alan Smith.
27 April 2018 Added Lee-Wainwright (Rd 2) - thanks to Gerard Killoran.
27 February 2020 The full 60-move score of Shoosmith-Wahltuch (Rd 2) is now available, thanks to Brian Denman.
29 November 2020 Added crosstables for all the subsidiary sections, along with many forenames and some biographical data, and the BCM report.